Owing a debt you can’t pay is a situation nobody wants to find themselves in, and it can be especially stressful when that debt is owed to the IRS. Many people fear the IRS and not without reason.

The IRS has collection powers that many creditors don’t have, including garnishing wages, seizing bank accounts, and even putting liens on property. Yet many people occasionally face a situation where they have a tax debt they just can’t pay. There are many options for dealing with tax debt, but ignoring it and hoping it goes away is not one of them. If you find yourself in this unfortunate situation, check out these tips for facing tax debts.

What if you don’t agree with the amount due?

If you owe a lot more than you expected, take a moment to review your completed return carefully to look for errors. Make sure you didn’t accidentally enter the same income twice or forget an important deduction, and make sure you answered all of the questions correctly. One missed question or checkbox can cause you to miss out on valuable tax benefits. Also, compare this year’s return to last year. If your tax bill went up drastically even though your situation hasn’t really changed, find out why.

Occasionally, taxpayers receive notices from the IRS indicating an amount due that they don’t agree with. Don’t feel like you have to pay an amount you don’t believe you owe just because it comes on IRS letterhead. Scott Taylor, a CPA with Piercy Bowler Taylor & Kern in Las Vegas, Nev., says each notice will include a section detailing how to respond.

“The IRS may have made an error in matching up 1099s or W-2s, and the amount owed needs to be adjusted,” he says, and he recommends that you send a letter via certified mail in response, with a full explanation. “A CPA can help you with this letter, but if you follow the guidelines provided by the IRS, you should be able to respond appropriately and have the fees resolved or adjusted.”