The National Women's Hall of Fame announced its 2017 inductees Tuesday morning in Seneca Falls.

New inductees include:

Matilda Raffa Cuomo, former first lady of New York, founder of Mentoring USA and an advocate for women, children and families.

Dr. Temple Grandin, animal scientist, author and champion of farm animal welfare. She designed livestock handling systems now used worldwide.

Lorraine Hansberry, playwright and civil rights activist.

Victoria Jackson, entrepreneur and advocate for women's empowerment.

Sherry Lansing, a filmmaker who was the first woman to head a major film studio.

Clare Boothe Luce, journalist, former war correspondent, U.S. congresswoman, U.S. ambassador.
Aimée Mullins, an amputee who excelled as an athlete, actor and motivational speaker.

Carol Mutter, first female three-star general in the U.S Marine Corps.

Dr. Janet Rowley, scientist and geneticist whose research established that some cancers are genetic diseases.

Alice Waters, chef and restaurateur who was a champion for organic foods and the local and sustainable food movement.

The announcement was made at the Gould Hotel, just down the road from the Women's Rights National Historical Park.

"We are pleased to add ten American women to the ranks of inductees whose leadership and achievements have changed the course of American history," Betty M. Bayer, the Hall's co-president and professor of women's studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, said in a news release.

Bayer said the women honored represent a variety of occupations.

"To this day, students arrive at college knowing very little about women's history," Bayer said. "There is still such a huge gap between what we know about women's history and what we need to know."

The new inductees will be celebrated at the New York Chiropractic College in Seneca Falls in September. Induction weekend events include a daytime induction ceremony and an evening gala.

All living inductees will attend the event, Bayer said. Three of the honored women — Boothe Luce, Hansberry and Rowley — will be represented by their families.

The National Women's Hall of Fame was founded in 1969. To date, 266 women have already been inducted into the Hall of Fame.

Women are nominated by the public and then vetted by a group of independent judges, Bayer said. This year 150 applications were submitted.