Thousands of students in the St. Louis area left the classrooms for a tangible science lesson during the eclipse.

The students from LaSalle Middle School, a public charter school in north St. Louis, would not have been able to see totality from their campus. Instead, they took a field trip to Glencoe to watch the eclipse. The students were able to watch from an open field.

“A lot of them this morning, as we were talking about the eclipse, said, ‘Wow, we're so excited to see this once in lifetime experience,’" said Amanda Henry, LaSalle’s principal. "It was important for us to get out of the city and experience this different setting.”

Before the eclipse, the teachers talked to students about safety precautions and they practiced the correct way to put the glasses on.

"It was fun. It was the first time I was able to see this, something disappearing, and coming back,” said JaMer Garth, a LaSalle student. “It was just so fun when the moon came. It was so fun.”

At Lindbergh High School, students spent the morning learning about the eclipse in the classroom. In Barry Marquart’s science classroom, students built models.

Later in the day, the school’s students and staff watched the eclipse from the football field.

“To have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and all the work and effort to put forth to give this opportunity the students and share it with them. It’s just awesome,” Marquart said.