A Wisconsin mom says her entire family eats healthier for an unlikely reason: her daughter's food allergies.

Amy Schwabe's daughter Alex, 13, is allergic to eggs and peanuts. After the diagnosis, Schwabe, editor at Metroparent Magazine, had to drastically change her own eating habits. The mom of two who was used to "heating things up," learned to cook and realized in some ways the diet change was for the better. She pays more attention to the foods she feeds her family. 

Amy Schwabe with daughters Wendy, 9, and Alex, 13.

Here are four ways her daughter's food allergies have forced the family to eat healthier:

1.  Homemade meals. Schwabe cooks now more than ever, hand-selecting the ingredients that go into her recipes. She also rarely goes out to eat, avoiding quick options that often include fat and added sugar.

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2. Use healthy substitutes. Because meals can't include eggs or peanuts, Schwabe has sought out more creative ways to prepare food. No eggs? Unsweetened applesauce will do the trick. 

3. Read labels. Schwabe never purchases an item without reading the label. While she's used to looking for allergens, she's also developed a keen eye for unhealthy additives. 

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4. Roast, boil and steam. Cross contamination is a constant worry for parents of children with food allergies. So, frying is out of the question. Instead, Schwabe bakes and boils. In turn, she's eating baked potatoes instead of french fries. 

Mom Bod is a USA TODAY video series featuring tips from moms on fitness, nutrition and mental health. The goal? Let's be real about the struggle to "healthy" and learn to love our mom bods.