If you clicked a 'like' button to help Jesus beat Satan in an arm-wrestling match to supposedly decide the presidency of the United States last year, you clicked right into the hands of the Russians.

Lawmakers on Wednesday released a few of the 3,000 fake ads purchased on Facebook by a Russian propaganda firm last year leading up to last year's presidential election. The release included ads' metadata, revealing which viewers the Russian effort targeted and their success.

They include an ad from a bogus group, "Army of Jesus," that pits the son of God against Hillary Clinton and targeted Facebook users who had "liked" topics such as God, Christianity, the Bible and Bill O'Reilly. Another ad, from the fake group "Blacktivist," targeted users who liked human rights and Malcolm X with an ad about the Black Panthers. 

"Russia was able to weaponize your platforms to divide us," Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., told attorneys for Facebook, Google and Twitter on Wednesday. 

It's OnPolitics Today, the daily politics roundup from USA TODAY. Subscribe here.

Trump pushes immigration limits after New York attack

President Trump didn't seek government changes immediately after last month's Las Vegas shooting. "We'll talk about that later," he said two days afterward. But the Tuesday attack that killed eight in New York City has prompted urgency from the president.

Trump on Wednesday proposed ending the Diversity Visa Lottery Program, which he said let the suspect in the attack and his family into the U.S. He also criticized the "laughingstock" of a justice system he said moves too slowly on terror cases.

Trump even floated sending the suspect to the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba — a legally questionable move given the suspect was arrested in the United States. Sen. Lindsey Graham also called for the suspect to be considered an "unlawful enemy combatant."

Republicans push back their tax plan

House Republicans pushed back plans to roll out their tax bill on Thursday, delaying it one day as they scrambled to finish it. The goal is to get Trump something to sign by Christmas, but Republicans currently can't agree on what should — and shouldn't — be in the bill. One issue is 401(k) plans, which could change with contribution limits getting slashed down to $2,400 a year. The limit is currently $18,000 or $24,000, depending on the person's age.

Meanwhile, Trump proposed paying for tax cuts by dismantling Obamacare

Elsewhere in politics: 

And with that, we're off to stress over Game 7 of the World Series. See you on the other side.