President Trump wanted Sen. Luther Strange to win Tuesday night's Alabama runoff against Roy Moore.

But a quick glance at his Twitter feed wouldn't reveal that, because the president deleted his most recent tweets supporting Strange.

The tweets, in order of when they were sent:

  • Sept. 25: "Big election tomorrow in the Great State of Alabama. Vote for Senator Luther Strange, tough on crime & border - will never let you down!"
  • Sept. 26: "Luther Strange has been shooting up in the Alabama polls since my endorsement. Finish the job - vote today for 'Big Luther.'"
  • Sept. 26: "ALABAMA, get out and vote for Luther Strange - he has proven to me that he will never let you down! #MAGA"

The president also deleted one tweet about Moore, but that appears to be because the first tweet included an error. At first, Trump called on Moore to win the special election in November, but that was corrected to say the special election was in December.

The White House hasn't yet offered any explanation for why the Strange tweets were deleted. And the president didn't delete all of his tweets that endorsed the senator. Between Aug. 8 and Sept. 23, Trump tweeted 13 times in support of Strange.

The deletions are far from the first time tweets from the @realDonaldTrump account have been taken down. The topics of those deleted tweets have ranged from the infamous "covfefe" moment to meetings with world leaders

Under the Presidential Records Act, the administration must preserve all presidential records. The National Archives has issued previous guidance that social media should be recorded. Earlier this year, it recommended that the administration capture and preserve all of the president's tweets, including those are deleted.

Still, it's worth remembering that tweets aren't officially considered records under the law. After the president deleted his "covfefe" tweet, Rep. Mike Quigley, D-Ill., introduced legislation that would amend the Presidential Records Act to say tweets and other social media from the president were considered documentary material. That would then ensure their preservation under the Presidential Records Act.