Behind every door.

"You guys better have a good joke ready."

There was a Halloween surprise.

Of course, trick-or-treating wouldn't be complete without Krackel candy bars and Twizzlers, but a hockey stick?

"The players can sign 'em for ya. You want a goalie stick? Is that cool?" said a locker room attendant.

"Uh, yeah," said one of the twelve children who had the opportunity to trick-or-treat inside of the Scottrade Center.

Once the twelve children and their families from St. Louis Children's hospital had their sticks in hand, it was time to enter door number two. And sitting inside were the Blues players patiently waiting to pass out more candy.

From forward Beau Bennett to defensemen Alex Pietrangelo, Robert Bortuzzo and Carl Gunnarsson, they say this is the highlight of their year.

"Just when they walk in that door you see them all dressed up and just how happy they are," said Gunnarsson. "We know they can't get out and do the regular trick or treat, so we're really happy to have 'em here."

And for children like Raquel Gebel, who was diagnosed with Wolfram syndrome in 2010, this is a Halloween that will be hard to top in the future. For both her and her brother.

"Raquel?" said her brother. Raquel responded, "I kind of liked meeting the Blues players."

Raquel's brother said his favorite part was getting the Blues' players autographs and the hockey stick.

"It's been awesome what the Blues have done," added their grandmother Sharon Gebel. "Awesome."

This marked the fourth year that the Blues opened up the Scottrade Center to trick-or-treaters on Halloween and it's the first time children from St. Louis Children's Hospital attended.