Webster Groves student aims for Breakthrough Prize

At stake? $400,000 that will go to more than just Emily Rapp.

WEBSTER GROVES, MO. - One Webster Groves High School student is hoping her knowledge on gyroscopes will award her a $400,000 scholarship.

Emily Rapp, a 17-year-old high school senior entered the Breakthrough Junior Challenge last month and advanced to the semifinals, reaching the top 30 out of a total of 6,000 applicants. For Rapp to advance, she is asked to have her video liked more and shared more than any of the other 29 remaining applicants also running neck-and-neck with each other.

Jurors of the Breakthrough Junior Challenge look for students who effectively communicate complex scientific ideas using engaged, imaginative and engaging methods. For Rapp, she used the basic fundamentals of how gyroscopes work and their importance in the real-world.

Rapp spent over two weeks researching, editing and preparing her script prior to filming. The video, which you can see above, was filmed in and around St. Louis to show her appreciation for the city she was born and raised in.

"I love this scholarship because not only will it open so many doors for my future, but it gives me the opportunity to give back to the community of Webster Groves that I love, and provide a fantastic gift for the most inspirational teacher I've ever said," said Rapp in a statement.

St. Louis-based model Karlie Kloss got in on the action, too. 

"Help her win a scholarship so she can pursue a college career in STEM, a state-of-the-art lab for my alma mater, and a prize for hardworking WGHS [sic] teacher," said Kloss in part on a Facebook post

If the award were to go to Rapp, she would receive $250,000, Webster Groves High School would receive a $100,000 state-of-the-art science lab, and the teacher Rapp nominated would receive $50,000.

The Breakthrough Junior Challenge Prize was created to help honor important advancements in the categories of mathematics, life sciences, and fundamental physics, as well as aim to celebrate the best scientific work in the next generation of scientists. Several notable people, including Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, helped found the Breakthrough Prize.

For more about the Breakthrough Junior Challenge, click here. To submit your vote for Rapp, click here.

© 2017 KSDK-TV


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