Gov. Greitens' nonprofit publishes GOP state senator's cellphone number

JEFFERSON CITY - A nonprofit aligned with Gov. Eric Greitens wants Missouri conservatives to send a message to Sen. Rob Schaaf.

Literally, A New Missouri, Inc., is asking people to call the state senator and ask him to "stop siding with the liberals" by gumming up the works of the state Senate.

Making it easier for voters to reach the St. Joseph Republican, who is serving his second Senate term, A New Missouri published Schaaf's cellphone number on its website.

"Politician Rob Schaaf is siding with liberals in the Senate against conservatives," a page on A New Missouri's website reads. "He is attempting to shut down all conservative action in the Senate because of personal political games that he is playing along with the liberals."

A similar message was sent out via Twitter on Thursday, and the nonprofit appears to have paid to boost the tweet's audience.

Schaaf expressed his disapproval in a statement: "I'm saddened that the governor lacks the courage to confront me directly but instead relies on his dark money donors to impugn my stand for liberty and the downtrodden and against corruption."

The practice of publishing personally identifiable information on the internet is known as "doxxing," a derivative of the word "document." The practice has been used more as internet access has spread and has been a method of revenge.

A New Missouri was formed to advocate for the policies and actions of Greitens. Because it's a nonprofit, A New Missouri is not required to disclose its donors, unlike Greitens' campaign committee. Spokespeople and staff for Greitens have said the governor's office, his campaign and the nonprofit act separately of each other.

Official spokesman Parker Briden denied that Greitens approved the decision to publish Schaaf's phone number.

Asked for comment, senior adviser Austin Chambers reiterated the message on the website and did not say when or why Schaaf's actions merited publishing the senator's cellphone number.

Frustrated with the passage of a prescription drug monitoring program and the expansion of managed care — as well as with the governor's acceptance of undisclosed contributions, or "dark money" — Schaaf has held the floor for extended periods of time this session. Previously, he had filibustered prescription monitoring on the grounds that it diminishes personal privacy, though he backed off his opposition this year.

Thursday, Schaaf used a parliamentary procedure on a bill to implement a Blue Alert system and spent almost an hour reading from a book called "Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion." Schaaf's reading selection came from early passages in the book that referenced the fundraising tactics of Hare Krishna followers and the Jonestown Massacre.

Sen. Jay Wasson, R-Nixa, told the News-Leader on Thursday he was unsure of Schaaf's motivation. "Best I can tell, he's just trying to train-wreck the place."

Other senators on both sides of the aisle have filibustered or threatened to do so on issues ranging from REAL ID to the now-scrapped repeal of a tax credit used by elderly renters. As a result, the Republican-dominated Senate has not been moving as smoothly as many had predicted.

© Gannett Co., Inc. 2017. All Rights Reserved


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