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Plenty of impressive baseball players have played at Busch Stadium, but not many have the bio of Erma Bergmann. A woman I played catch with back in 2001 as she reminisced about being recruited by the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

"Al Nicoli was his name and he asked me to play professional and I told you I said where will I sleep, what will I eat, I was that naive," Bergmann explains.

She played in the league from 1946 to 1951.

"I made 75 dollars a week, that was big pay," she adds.

She not only helped the Muskegon Lassies win the pennant in '47, but threw a no-hitter that same year against the Grand Rapids Chicks and this week her name was once again across her back.

"Yeah I'm ready, put me in coach," Bergmann says.

Barbara Hoffman and Audrey Lafser, two friends from the league were by her side and a baseball was in her hand.

"Well can I have a warm-up toss?" She asks.

Because for her 90th birthday she headed back to the mound or a little in front of it to toss out the first pitch.

"I couldn't do it, I couldn't do it," she says to the catcher.

She obviously hasn't lost that competitive drive.

"I knew I'd have to practice more," Bergmann points out.

It's that attitude that put her into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, the St. Louis Sports Hall of Fame and the Softball Hall of Fame.

"I don't memorize that I just say thank you god for everything," Bergmann explains.

So at 90 years old, her fastball isn't what it used to be, but Erma Bergman is still in a league of her own.

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