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ST. LOUIS (KSDK) - Some popular dog treats have been voluntarily recalled.

Nestle Purina PetCare Company has voluntarily withdrawn Waggin' Train and Canyon Creek Ranch brand dog treats until further notice after the New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets found trace amounts of antibiotic residue in samples of the chicken jerky products.

The antibiotics found in the products are approved for use in poultry in China and European Union member states but are not approved in the United States.

New York authorities requested the removal of the products from retail locations, which was agreed to by the company. Nestle Purina then decided to voluntarily withdraw the products nationwide.

Nestle Purina contacted the Food and Drug Administration about the trace amounts of antibiotic residue, but the amount of the residue does not pose a health or pet safety risk.

In January 2012,5 on Your Side reported on the possible dangers of dog treats made in China.

The FDA has issued two warnings about possible dangers of Chinese-made chicken jerky dog products since 2007 after 621 cases were reported about problems with vomiting, diarrhea, kidney failure and death. The cautions did not reference a particular brand.

Nestle Purina says there is no indication the antibiotic residue is connected to the FDA's ongoing investigation into chicken jerky products.

Nestle Purina released the following Q&A to help ease the minds of customers:
Q: Why are you withdrawing these products?

A: All of us at Nestlé Purina and Waggin' Train care very deeply about pets and pet owners, and the quality and safety of our products are our top priorities. The New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets (NYSDAM) has advised us that they found trace amounts of antibiotic residue in a limited number of samples of our chicken jerky treats.

These trace amounts of antibiotic residue do not pose a health risk to pets. These antibiotics are approved for use in poultry in China and other major countries, including European Union member states, but are not among those approved in the U.S. Antibiotics are commonly used globally, including in the United States, when raising animals fit for human consumption. Waggin' Train and Canyon Creek Ranch products are safe to feed as directed. However, due to regulatory inconsistencies among countries, the presence of antibiotic residue is technically considered adulteration in the United States. These findings do not pose a safety risk to pets. The health of pets and the relationship of trust we have with pet owners are critically important to us.

Q: What products are included in this product withdrawal?

A: All Waggin' Train and Canyon Creek Ranch brand dog treats are being withdrawn until further notice. No other Purina brand treats are included in this withdrawal. In addition, Canyon Creek Ranch dog and cat foods, which are manufactured in the United States, are not included in this withdrawal.

Q: Have there been any complaints or reports of illness caused by the antibiotic residue?

A: No. The trace amounts of antibiotic residue do not pose a health risk to pets at the levels detected. There is no connection between the trace amount of antibiotic residue found in these samples and the ongoing FDA investigation into chicken jerky treats.

Q: What symptoms should I watch for in my dog?

A: The trace amounts of antibiotic residue do not pose a health risk to pets at the levels detected, and no related pet illnesses have been reported.

However, any time you have questions or concerns regarding the health of your pet, we encourage you to contact your veterinarian.

Q: Is this related to the FDA's advisory about chicken jerky treats in China, and the consumer reports of illness and death of dogs consuming chicken jerky treats?

A: No. There is no connection between the trace amount of antibiotic residue found in these samples and the ongoing FDA investigation into chicken jerky treats.

Q: Where in the United States were the products in this withdrawal distributed for purchase?

A: The affected products were distributed nationally.

Q: When did you become aware there could be an issue with these products?

A: The New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets (NYSDAM) advised Nestlé Purina on January 7, 2013, that the agency found trace amounts of antibiotic residue in a limited number of samples of its chicken jerky treats. The trace amounts of antibiotic residue do not pose a health risk to pets, and no pet illnesses related to this issue have been reported.

Q: What should I do if my dog is experiencing health problems after consuming these products?

A: If you have any concerns regarding the health of your pet, we encourage you to contact your veterinarian.

Q: What should I do if I believe I purchased one of these products?

A: Although the product is safe, it is technically considered adulterated, and we would recommend you dispose of it. If you no longer have the product, no further action is required.

Q: I fed the product to my dog, but he doesn't have any symptoms yet. What should I do?

A: The trace amounts of antibiotic residue do not pose a health risk to pets at these levels.

Q: Are there any environmental concerns with disposing the affected product?

A: No.

Q: My cat ate some of this product. Should I be concerned?

A: No. The trace amounts of antibiotic residue do not pose a health risk to pets.

Q: How many other cases of antibiotic residue have been reported with this product?

A: We are unaware of any other reports of antibiotic residue occurring in these products.

Anyone with questions can contact Nestle Purina pet advisors at 866-283-2923.

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