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By Stephanie Ramirez

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WEWS/CNN) - A postal worker in Ohio is being credited for saving an elderly man's life while on his delivery route.

The worker noticed something just didn't seem right, and it turns out, he was right.

"You look out for others and you expect others to look out for you," said U.S. Postal Service Carrier Jason Jones.

It's the code this Postal Service employee of about five years has stuck to on Cleveland's east side.

Jones says being aware of your surroundings is an essential part of his job, but he wasn't expecting to actually save a man's life.

"When I found out he was actually inside the house, I was very shocked," said Jones.

He says last Thursday, while on his regular route, he noticed a gentleman he normally delivers to hadn't picked up the mail in a few days and he hadn't mentioned anything of going away.

"He's one of my number one customers that come and greet me every other day, so I started noticing that something must be wrong," said Jones.

Perhaps the biggest clue of something wrong he says was that there were no footprints in the snow that surrounded the 91-year-old's house and his car hadn't been moved for a while.

But instead of just noting this and moving on, Jones says he called for help, not once, but twice.

"I called the police, they said they'll check into it. I came back the next day in the morning I drove past, I still didn't see any footprints from Mr. Clair and his car still hadn't moved. So I called the police again," said Jones.

What police found, Jones says, was Mr. Jack Clair unconscious on the floor of his own home.

Clair's next-door neighbor, Duane Todd, says 91-year-old Clair was also malnourished and dehydrated.

"I felt that the postal man needed to be recognized for the job that he did because if he wouldn't have notified someone, Mr. Jack would've died," said Todd.

Clair is being treated at a nursing and rehabilitation facility.

Postal workers are trained to pay attention to what could be life-threatening situations for their customers.

It has been part of the "Carrier Alert Program" offered to USPS employees since 1982.

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