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ST. LOUIS - After what Dow Boyer calls three long and lonely months at the Lincoln County Jail this moment was pure joy.

The day did not start as a joyous one, when Boyer says at 4 a.m. she got a wakeup call in jail.

"It was a nightmare, I was just scared," she said. When they told her to pack her belongings she feared the worst, but was confused.

"We were driving down the highway and I seen him turn at the airport and I just started bawling," she said.

Boyer knew that at any time she could be deported, but she was told she would get a warning. Monday morning was sent to Chicago where she was allowed to make a call. She called her husband who in turn called their attorney, who called Homeland Security.

Less than an hour before her flight to Thailand, the officer Boyer was with got the news.

"He goes don't scream," she recalled. "He showed me the text and it said Dow Boyer something about get off the flight and I just like screamed and I hugged him and he was like you can't hug me! And I said I'm sorry!"

Not only was she not being deported, she wasn't going back to jail. She was going home, and finally able to see her daughter at home who's been wondering where mommy is.

"When am I going to come home, mom will be home soon, she thinks I'm at work," Boyer said. Boyer and her husband want life to be normal again.

"I just can't wait to go home," she said.

The deportation order is stayed, but not overturned. Her attorneys hope to get her conviction overturned, which would hopefully reverse the deportation order. Her ultimate goal is to become a naturalized U.S. citizen and she wants to pay back the money she stole.

- After what Dow Boyer calls three long and lonely months at the Lincoln County jail this moment was pure joy.

The day did not start as a joyous one, when Boyer says at 4 a.m. she got a wakeup call in jail.

"It was a nightmare, I was just scared," she said. When they told her to pack her belongings she feared the worst, but was confused.

"We were driving down the highway and I seen him turn at the airport and I just started bawling," she said.

Boyer knew that at any time she could be deported, but she was told she would get a warning. Monday morning was sent to Chicago where she was allowed to make a call. She called her husband who in turn called their attorney, who called Homeland Security.

Less than an hour before her flight to Thailand, the officer Boyer was with got the news.

"He goes don't scream," she recalled. "He showed me the text and it said Dow Boyer something about get off the flight and I just like screamed and I hugged him and he was like you can't hug me! And I said I'm sorry!"

Not only was she not being deported, she wasn't going back to jail. She was going home, and finally able to see her daughter at home who's been wondering where mommy is.

"When am I going to come home, mom will be home soon, she thinks I'm at work," Boyer said. Boyer and her husband want life to be normal again.

"I just can't wait to go home," she said.

The deportation order is stayed, but not overturned. Her attorneys hope to get her conviction overturned, which would hopefully reverse the deportation order. Her ultimate goal is to become a naturalized U.S. citizen and she wants to pay back the money she stole.

Boyer's deportation order is stayed not overturned.

Her lawyers hope to get her conviction overturned which would hopefully get rid of the deportation order.

Ultimately the goal is to get her naturalized as a U.S. citizen and she says she wants to pay back her employer.

A local woman who has been battling to stay in the country will be reunited with her family Monday afternoon.

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