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Family members of those killed in the 9/11 terror attacks are angry about the new museum that just opened in New York. They say it doesn't honor the victims.

Jim Riches lost his son Jimmy, a firefighter, on 9/11, but he won't set foot inside the museum meant to honor the victims.

"It's disgusting. Totally horrible they were dancing on our son's grave. I'm very insulted and I think they crossed the line," said Riches.

The latest splashy headlines documented a VIP cocktail party at the museum the same week it opened. Another affront to some who are already fuming over the museum's gift shop, the plans to open a restaurant and $24 admission fee.

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"I think it's now become a money machine, a revenue generating tourist attraction," said Riches.

The museum is defending the party, which they call a "donor reception." In a statement, the memorial's president, Joe Daniels, said, "It is absolutely appropriate to thank donors who gave hundreds of millions of dollars and others -- including family members who worked so hard the make the museum a reality." part of that reality generating revenue. Museum organizers say it costs $65 million dollars a year to run.

But some families insist their loss shouldn't be part of a gain for any reason.

"To have a cocktail party over the graves of 8,000 human remains of NYC's heroes and victims is truly a sacrilege," said Sally Regenhard, who lost her son.

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The unidentified human remains are housed in the underground museum, behind a wall. Some family members feel the location isn't fit for a final resting place. They're vowing to fight to have their loved ones moved above ground, as part of the memorial, which is free to the public.

"We wanted to honor and memorialize our loved ones, and to tell the story of that day. What happened, I think they lost track of what they were going to do," said Riches.

The unidentified human remains are housed in the underground museum, behind a wall. Some family members feel the location isn't fit for a final resting place. They're vowing to fight to have their loved ones moved above ground - as part of the memorial which is free to the public.

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