GREENSBORO, N.C. — You've heard us talk about the ridiculous cost for an Epi-pen. It's inspired the creation of several low-cost alternatives. Consumer Reports looked at a couple of them.

But let's start with the actual EpiPen. It's about $650 without insurance. The generic is $350. The manufacturer offers to cover up to $300 in out-of-pocket costs for people with commercial insurance through its access and savings programs. Medicare, Medicaid, or insurance through the VA won't qualify. 

Then there's Auvi-Q. You'll need a doctor's approval to get it. Ask or an epinephrine injector but don't specify a brand. If you have commercial insurance, you can get it free from Walgreens. If you don't live near a Walgreens you can fill out this form with your doctor's help to get it shipped to you at no cost. It will take a few days, however. If you don't have insurance and make less than $100,000 dollars a year, you can get it free through the company by filling out this form and faxing it to the creator, Kaleo.

Symjepi isn't an auto-injector but can still save your life. Again, ask for an epinephrine injector but don't specify a brand. Without insurance it usually costs $250. But people with commercial insurance you can pay as little as $0 for your copay for claims up to $300 a month. The maximum is $1,000 a year.

Finally, there's Adrenaclick. Without insurance, it's $270. But CVS And target offer it for $109. They also offer a discount copay coupon to be used at any pharmacy.

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