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Mercy hospitals seeking blood donors due to cancellations of blood drives

There is still a need for blood donations for trauma patients, cancer patients, labor and delivery moms, and NICU babies, Mercy said

ST. LOUIS — Mercy Hospital St. Louis put out a call for help. The hospitals need blood donations of all blood types and platelets.

Since many colleges, high schools and businesses are either closed or have gone to a remote model, large blood drives in the area have been canceled.

There is still a great need for blood donations for trauma patients, cancer patients, labor and delivery moms and NICU babies, according to a press release from Mercy.

“Mercy Blood Donor Services is closely following the recommendations from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding COVID-19,“ said Emily Schindler, MD, PhD, medical director for Blood Donor Services at Mercy Hospital St. Louis. “As communities are affected, it is imperative that healthy individuals continue to donate blood.”

Donors must be healthy, over the age of 16 and weigh at least 115 pounds. Donors who are 16 years old must bring a parental consent form in order to donate.

Mercy is screening all donors about their current and past medical history and is taking extra precautions for COVID-19, which include:

  • Donors are asked not to donate if they have been out of the United States in the past 28 days.
  • Donors must not have been diagnosed with or suspected of having COVID-19.
  • Donors must not live with someone who has been diagnosed or is suspected of having COVID-19.
  • Donors will have their temperature taken upon arrival.

For more information about how to donate, call 866-373-6667 or click here.

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