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Woman receives refund after mistakenly paying $5,784 on $57.84 AT&T bill

The Washington woman finally got her money back after notifying AT&T of the mistake seven weeks ago.

UPDATE Dec. 24: 

Carol Doty received her refund from AT&T on Dec. 24.

UPDATE Dec. 23:

AT&T reached out to Carol Doty after KGW's story aired and promised she would have her money back by Thursday.

Original story from Dec. 20:

RIDGEFIELD, Wash. -- Carol Doty of Ridgefield, Washington, thought she paid AT&T $57.84 last month.

"I was like, 'Oh my god.' I thought I was going to throw up at that moment. It was not $57.84. It was $5,784.00 that I overpaid because I accidentally moved the decimal point," said Doty.

Doty overpaid the company on Nov. 6. She contacted them about the mistake the very next day and has been getting the runaround ever since

"At one point we were told we couldn't get that money back. That the amount was too large and we would have to keep it as a credit on the bill," said Doty.

Doty, who is on the account but not the primary account holder, said she's called the company, emailed, faxed and visited an AT&T store but still doesn't have her money.

"It is frustrating beyond explanation when you are talking to someone reading from a script who cannot help you. They are not helping you to resolve the issue," said Doty.

She's sharing her story so the company knows what a terrible customer experience she's had.

"I paid you too much money and I just want that money back," said Doty.

KGW Investigates reached out to AT&T. 

A corporate spokesperson said they issued a check Dec. 5 and they are working with a third-party vendor to process the refund as soon as possible but could not give a date of when Doty will get her money.

Doty has filed a complaint with the Washington Attorney General's Office. 

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