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ESPN releases trailer for McGwire/Sosa documentary to air June 14

ESPN's 30 for 30 documentary will take an in-depth look at the 1998 home run chase with new interviews from McGwire and Sosa

The summer of 1998 was one of the wildest in baseball history. Now, it's getting the 30 for 30 treatment.

Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa's chase to top Roger Maris' single-season home record has been made into a documentary to air on ESPN.

"Long Gone Summer" will air June 14 at 8 p.m. central time, but on Friday, ESPN released a trailer to get fans excited. (And if you listen close, you might even hear a certain 5 On Your Side anchor)

You can click here to watch it.

The documentary will feature brand new interviews with McGwire, and the ever-elusive Sosa.

McGwire was the first to reach 62 home runs that season to top Maris' record, and went on to hit 70, a record that stood for just three years until Barry Bonds broke it in 2001. Sosa ended up hitting 66 home runs that season, and won the National League MVP Award.

With interest in baseball lagging due to the players' strike, it has often been though that the 1998 home run chase went a long way towards reinvigorating the sport around the country.

However, 22 years later, the summer of 1998 does come with an asterisk. McGwire has admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs, and Sosa has long been suspected of PED use as well.

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