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Diesel drivers paying record-high prices

GasBuddy reports that diesel drivers are paying 22.6 cents more at the pump, nationally, with prices at $5.518 per gallon of diesel.

ST. LOUIS — The price at the pump just seems to get higher and higher every week, and last week was no different.

Gas prices in St. Louis have risen 12.2 cents in just one week, according to a GasBuddy report. Metro gas prices are 21.4 cents higher than a month ago averaging at $4.07. 

Statewide, drivers in the Show Me State are seeing slightly higher price increases than St. Louis drivers at a 13.1 cent per gallon increase in the last week, GasBuddy reports.

Missouri's average regular gas price at $3.891 per gallon still falls short of the all-time Missouri high of $3.945 set in 2008.

For Illinois drivers, gas prices increased nearly 20 cents per gallon in just one week, according to GasBuddy. Prices in Illinois are $4.60 a gallon, the report said. This sets an all-time high for gas prices in Illinois.

Nationally, gas prices are 13.6 cents more than the previous week and 19.6 cents higher than a month ago, according to the report. 

And if you pay for diesel, the following numbers will probably hurt. 

GasBuddy reports that diesel drivers are paying 22.6 cents more at the pump, nationally, with prices at $5.518 per gallon of diesel. 

Diesel is at $5.203 per gallon in Missouri and $5.254 in Illinois. This price sets an all-time high for both states.

"Not only are diesel prices at a record high, they are at their largest differential to gasoline on record, surpassing the 98-cent difference in 2008 and currently standing at a $1.20 per gallon premium," said Patrick De Haan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy in the report.  

“It don’t take much to spend $1000 on a fill up," said truck driver Dan Beruski.

"While motorists filling with gasoline have seen a slight rise in prices, diesel's surge will be a double whammy as diesel prices will soon be passed along to retail channels, further pushing up the cost of goods," De Haan said.

“Even our parts on our equipment went up," said Beruski.  "Tires went up.  Everything has gone up in price.”

De Haan credits the increase in gas and diesel fuel prices to the European Union desire to sanction Russian oil, along with a decline in U.S. petroleum inventories, as the summer driving season nears. 

“There maybe a little relief here and there, but I don’t see an organized decline for either gasoline or diesel in the months ahead," said De Haan.  "It’s going to be a bumpy ride this summer.”

 

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