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Here are some of the rainfall totals across the St. Louis region

Some areas saw more than 12 inches of rain on Tuesday.

ST. LOUIS — Historic rainfall moved through the St. Louis area early Tuesday morning and brought significant flooding to the region.

Rainfall totals across the area ranged from 5 to 12 inches. Wentzville, O’Fallon, St. Paul and St. Peters saw rainfall totals closer to 12 inches while most areas in St. Louis County saw between 5 to 10 inches.

St. Louis Lambert International Airport reported a daily rain total of 8.64 inches, which shatters the previous daily record of 6.85 inches set in 1915.

The 24-hour storm total was recorded at 9.07 inches. The previous 24-hour storm record was 7.02 inches in 1915.

RELATED: St. Louis forecast: Rain ending Wednesday morning, still muggy

Tuesday rainfall totals

  • St. Peters – 12.86 inches
  • Wentzville – 11.62 inches
  • Creve Coeur – 11.44 inches
  • University City – 11.21 inches
  • O’Fallon – 11 inches
  • St. Ann – 10.85 inches
  • St. Paul – 10.58 inches
  • Maryland Heights – 10.35 inches
  • St. Charles – 9.64 inches
  • Richmond Heights – 7.8 inches
  • St. Louis – 7.79 inches
  • Cahokia Heights, Ill. – 7.24 inches
  • Cottleville – 7.22 inches
  • Lemay – 6.3 inches
  • Belleville, Ill. – 6.23 inches
  • Fairmont City, Ill. – 6.16 inches

RELATED: This is what the St. Louis 1915 rainfall record looked like

Historic 24-hour storm totals

  • Aug. 19-20, 1915 – 7.02 inches
  • Aug. 15-16, 1946 – 6.66 inches
  • May 16-17, 1995 – 6.55 inches
  • Aug. 14-15, 1946 – 6.52 inches

The storm brought significant flooding to the St. Louis area that destroyed homes and vehicles. Emergency shelters were opened up for those who were displaced. 

One person was killed in the floods in the City of St. Louis. According to police, the person drowned in a car on Skinker Boulevard and Rosedale.

The heavy downpours also impacted St. Louis area animal shelters, where some animals died as a result of the flooding.

If you’re a victim of the flooding or want to know how you can help, click here.

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