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4 Missouri members of U.S. House Representatives say they will contest Electoral College votes

It comes a day after Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley he will raise objections next week when Congress meets to affirm President-elect Joe Biden’s victory in the election
Credit: US House of Representatives
Representatives Vicky Hartzler (R, MO-04), Sam Graves (R, MO-06), Billy Long (R, MO-07) and Jason Smith(R, MO-08)

Four members of the United States Congress who represent Missouri said they will object to the official count of the Electoral College. They join other Republicans who have indicated that they plan to oppose the vote when it is presented before a joint session of Congress next Wednesday.

Representatives Vicky Hartzler (R, MO-04), Sam Graves (R, MO-06), Billy Long (R, MO-07) and Jason Smith(R, MO-08) co-authored a letter published to Smith's website declaring their intention to object.

"Next week, your 117th United States Congress will convene for the first time. After the election of Speaker and the adoption of the Rules of Congress, the action will quickly move to reading aloud the electoral votes submitted by each state from this past November's election - counting them, and declaring the vote tally for President and Vice President. During that process, the question will be put before your elected officials - does anyone object to the certification of electoral votes of a state. We will object. Our hope is that others will join us," the letter said.

The letter alleges illegal voting activity in Georgia, Pennsylvania and Nevada that the representatives say diminishes "every Missourians' vote."

Ann Wagner and Blaine Luetkemeyer, Republicans who represent parts of the St. Louis area, have not said whether they will support the effort.

A range of nonpartisan election officials and Republicans has confirmed there was no fraud in the November contest that would change the results of the election. That includes former Attorney General William Barr, who said he saw no reason to appoint a special counsel to look into the president’s claims about the 2020 election. He resigned from his post last week.

Trump and his allies have filed roughly 50 lawsuits challenging election results, and nearly all has been dismissed or dropped. He’s also lost twice at the U.S. Supreme Court.

Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., said Wednesday he will raise objections next week when Congress meets to affirm President-elect Joe Biden’s victory in the election, forcing House and Senate votes that are likely to delay — but in no way alter — the final certification of Biden's win. 

RELATED: Sen. Hawley says he will object to Electoral College results next week

When Congress convenes to certify the Electoral College results, any lawmaker can object to a state’s votes on any grounds. But the objection is not taken up unless it is in writing and signed by both a member of the House and a member of the Senate.

When there is such a request, then the joint session suspends and the House and Senate go into separate sessions to consider it. For the objection to be sustained, both chambers must agree to it by a simple majority vote. If they disagree, the original electoral votes are counted.

As president of the Senate, Vice President Mike Pence will preside over the Jan. 6 session and declare the winner.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., had asked his caucus not to participate in a futile quest to overturn the results.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.